A casino has been fined £650,000 after a gambler killed himself after losing £25,000 in a single night on roulette and ‘crack cocaine’ slot machines.

An investigation by the Gambling Commission into the death of Huseyin Yaman found that Aspers Casino had failed in its social responsibility to properly monitor the businessman during a night of heavy gambling.

The Turkish family man, 37, was found hanged at his home in Hackney, North London, after losing the five figure some in just a few hours playing one of the controversial machines and a gaming table at Aspers Casino at the Westfield Shopping Centre in Stratford, game win 88 east London, in November 2018.

An inquest later ruled his death as suicide.

Huseyin Yaman, 37, blew a five figure sum on the roulette table and highly-addictive machines in just a few hours

Huseyin Yaman, 37, blew a five figure sum on the roulette table and highly-addictive machines in just a few hours

Mr Yaman was a VIP guest at the casino and was said to have previously racked up losses of around £100,000.

On the night of his death, police had to be called to the casino after he became argumentative with staff and he was escorted from the premises.

Apsers bosses had failed to adhere to its social responsibility code to look out for customers whose behaviour might indicate a problem with betting, the Gambling Commission report found.

Slot machines sit on the gaming floor at Aspers Casino at Westfield Stratford City Mall in London

Slot machines sit on the gaming floor at Aspers Casino at Westfield Stratford City Mall in London

The commission ruled that they failed to talk with Mr Yaman, who was not named in the report, identified only as Mr X.

It said the casino had a ‘misguided assumption that Mr X could afford the level of losses.

There were failures in record keeping.’

It said the scale of ‘failures in relation to Mr X were exceptional’

Sources say Mr Yaman was approached  on two occasions and asked if he had a gambling problem, but was not removed from the casino at  Westfield Shopping Centre in Stratford

Sources say Mr Yaman was approached on two occasions and asked if he had a gambling problem, but was not removed from the casino at Westfield Shopping Centre in Stratford

The casino was also criticised over its monitoring of cash purchases by its customers.

They failed to make any inquiries of Mr Hassan in September 2017 when he spent £46,000 and £51,000 over two days.

They also allowed him to go over the £5,000 limit on three other visits when he played on electronic roulette.

After Mre Hasan’s death Aspers launched its own investigation into lapses in their code of conduct and in its report the commission said the company had attempted to rectify its failings.

They were initially ordered to pay a £1.8m fine, but this was reduced to £652,00 after representations from the casino over its financial situation due to the lockdown.

Mr Yaman, who owned a stake in a Turkish supermarket, had been gambling for up to two years at Aspers.

Sources said was approached on at least two occasions and asked if he had a gambling problem, but was not removed from the casino.

A family member told MailOnline after his death they had ‘no idea’ that Mr Yaman had a gambling problem and had they known, they would have stepped in to help him.

‘Huseyin was not in financial difficulty,’ said the relative.

‘He was a cheerful guy. This has come as a complete shock to the family. We didn’t know that he was gambling heavily. We didn’t have to collect him from betting shops.

‘If he had money troubles, I would have helped him. He seemed happy.

We just didn’t see this coming.’

 A spokesperson for Aspers said: ‘We co-operated fully with the Gambling Commission’s investigation into this tragic event and accept the Commission’s findings and sanction. We acknowledge that our policies, procedures and controls at the time could have been better in some important respects and that there were weaknesses and shortcomings in relation to their effective implementation.

‘Following an immediate internal review in 2018 and extensive dialogue with the Commission and other public authorities, these have been fully addressed.

‘Before recording her verdict of suicide on our customer, the Coroner heard that there were a number of circumstances which may have contributed to it.

Naturally, our deepest sympathies remain with the family for their loss.’